126. Team WCW (Roddy Piper, Diamond Dallas Page, The Warrior) vs. Team NWO Wolfpack (Kevin Nash, Lex Luger, Sting) vs. Team NWO Hollywood (Hulk Hogan, Bret Hart, Stevie Ray). (War Games Match for a Shot at the WCW Championship, WCW Fall Brawl 1998)

WarGames 2000 was an atrocity, a besmirchment on the very gimmick of War Games. Just when I thought I couldn’t scrape the barrel anymore, I watched the War Games match from 2000 (click here for my review). This one was the traditional, two cage set-up that War Games 2000 ignored in favour of three tiers of cages. But Fall Brawl 1998 version of War Games featured just as much nonsensical booking, lacklustre action, and unnecessary complications as War Games 2000.

Once again, the wrestlers are split into teams…but the single winner gets a shot at the WCW Championship at a later date. Why even have teams? Oh, and one entrant, Sting, already has a World title shot booked for the following night’s Nitro. So what if he won this War Games match and won the WCW title the following night? Already, I was wondering what the hell is going on. There are three teams of three people each: WCW, NWO Hollywood, and NWO Wolfpac…but these teams don’t seem to matter (well, apart from NWO Hollywood). Oh, and pinfalls count from the beginning of the bout, so the bot can end at any time (unlile previous War Games matches. They only started when everybody had entered the ring, and ended with either ‘Submission or Surrender’).

To be fair, Diamond Dllas Page and Bret Hart get things off to a decent start…but things quickly fall apart as soon as the third entrant, Stevie Ray enters. I mean…no disrespect to the guy, but he brings things down to a snail’s pace. Proceedings don’t even improve when Sting enters, as he attempts to jump from ring to ring and trips over both top ropes. As more people enter and attack their own team members, the confusion rises and the action becomes a slow-motion blur of inanity. And there is a bigger than usual gap between the two rings, the gap causing the wrestlers to stumble over it, adding to the sheer absurdity of it all.

Hulk Hogan ignores the (on-screen) timer and enters when he likes; he then proceeds to continually hit his LEG DROP OF DOOM on Kevin Nash, obviously waiting for an in-ring cue. The ring fills up with smoke…and the Un-Ultimate Warrior appears…only to disappear and enter from backstage (as an aside, the trap door that Warrior used to enter during the smoke caused Beitish Bulldog to injure his back earlier on in the show, possibly causing his addiction to painkillers in the late 1990s).

Then it becomes all about Warrior and Hogan, a rematch seven years in the making (and one I had the displeasure of watching one evening…click here for my review of that abomination). After they are taken out of the arena by policemen (in a War Games match? It’s all about uncontrolled violence, a perfect arena for the blood feud between Hogan and Warrior! Why were they escorted off the premises?). To top things off, it looks like the ending pinfall is botched (was Bret Hart supposed to break it up?!?!).

Just like War Games 2000, this sullies the very gimmick of War Games and gives an insight into the many failings of WCW at the times. Indeed, even in 1998, things were looking awful indeed. There’s nothing worth recommending here at all, unless you want to waste almost half an hour of your life in one of the worst ways possible. Dave Meltzer rated this one -4*, and while I’d never rate anything that badly (apart from a Great Khali match, maybe), this doesn’t even deserve a single star.

Hammy’s Rating: * (out of 5)

(Click here for more of ‘A Wrestling Match A Day‘)

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